Pot Roast with Soy, Ginger, Sake & Shiitake Mushrooms

What fun it would be to cook this meal on a fireplace like this in the Summer Kitchen!

Soy, Ginger & Sake Beef Pot Roast with Shiitake Mushrooms

From “Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table

(A great twist on the typical Pot Roast)

Servings 6-8

  • Ingredients:
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 4 lbs.  Manchester-Farms Organic Grass-Fed Beef Chuck or Shoulder Roast a
  • 1 cup sake
  • 1 lg. white onion, cut into ½ inch thick slices
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 2 inch piece unpeeled fresh ginger, washed and cut into ¼ inch thick slices
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 18 small shiitake mushrooms, stemmed
  • 3 tbsp cornstarch
  • 3 tbsp cold water
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced, for garnishing

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. In a heavy Dutch oven or other large heavy pan that can go in the oven. Heat the vegetable oil over medium high heat. Sear the Roast until it is nicely browned on all sides, about 2 -4 minutes. Remove Roast from pan and set aside.

Pour the sake into the pan and scrap up all the browned bits. Add the onions, garlic and ginger. Dissolve sugar in the soy sauce in small bowl and pour over meat. Add the mushrooms and cover. Bring pan to a boil.

Remove the pan from stove top and place in oven covered. Cook for 3 hours, until meat is tender. Turn the roast over after ½ cooking time.

Remove meat to a platter and separate mushrooms and onions from liquid by straining it. Set the vegetables aside and keep them warm. Return the sauce to pan and bring to a boil. Boil for a few minutes to reduce.

In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and water together, then whisk into the sauce. Return to a boil until thickened, whisking constantly. Taste and add salt and pepper if needed.

Place meat on plate and pour sauce over, sprinkle with green onions and serve.

2 thoughts on “Pot Roast with Soy, Ginger, Sake & Shiitake Mushrooms”

  1. Did you try this! Very good and interesting to boot! Your neighbors will not be dining on the same!
    Thanks for your support!
    Best,
    Margie Manchester

  2. Put a fork in it and see if it starts to shred. Future recerenfe, thaw it out ahead of time, preferably two or three days. That way some of the excess water and blood can drip out instead of ending up in the broth in your cooker. Nothing wrong with pulling that roast out, cooling for a couple of minutes, cutting in half, and throwing it back in. Next time for may want to consider a different cut for the crock, roasts are meant to be roasted!

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